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Rare Bird Sightings
January 2006

Little Bunting - Photo  Copyright 2006 Steve Botham: s.botham@ntlworld.com
Photo: Steve Botham

UK Safari Tip:
Need help identifying birds? One of the best field guides is the "Collins Bird Guide" - available through the Amazon bookshop -  click here

This Little Bunting was spotted by Steve Botham at Stiffkey Marsh in Norfolk on the 15th January. These birds are normally found in northern Scandinavia, where they breed,  and further east to Siberia. According to the BTO only around 29 Little Buntings arrive on our shores each year.



Male Crossbill - Photo  Copyright 2006 Dean Eades

A flock of Crossbills were spotted at Walesby wood Lincs on the 20th January by Dean Eades and Steve Botham.

Female Crossbill - Photo  Copyright 2006 Steve Botham: s.botham@ntlworld.com

These Stocky little finches have a heavy beak which has crossed tips, hence the name. Numbers of these birds can fluctuate wildly from year to year. Scottish Crossbills, which look very similar, are now very scarce and red listed.



Waxwing - Photo  Copyright 2006 Colin Ebdon

More Waxwings were spotted on 16th January by Colin Ebdon. This time in the car park of 'Homebase' in Pitsea, Essex. According to members of the local RSPB group, the birds had been coming and going for a week and the numbers appear to have increased steadily, peaking at around 30+ individuals. 

Colin said they didn't scoff the berries all at once. They took two or three and then flew back to perch and feed. He was told by one of the RSPB boys that their digestive system could not cope with too many at one time, so they wait a while before taking more.

We also heard from Paul Teasdale who had 51 Waxwings feeding off a berry tree in his front garden in Pelton, County Durham.




Track Down More Info

Top 50 Garden Birds ID Chart
Wetland Birds Identification Chart
UK Safari Rare Bird Section
UK Safari Bird Section








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